Practical Leadership Development

What happens here can transform

By   Pete Pillsbury

All too often the focus in leadership training or development courses is on learning about research on effective leadership and various theories of leadership; participants are likely to walk away with more clarity on the concepts of effective leadership and greater understanding of the research and theories of leadership. However, they are mostly left on their own to figure out what these concepts mean personally and how they are translated into effective leadership behaviors on the job.

Recognizing this behavioral gap, TargetSuccess set out to develop leadership training that was light on research and concepts yet heavy on practice of behaviors. Light on research or concepts does not mean that research and concepts are not important. In fact, they are of critical importance, and we cite the sources of our research for those who wish to delve deeply into the theoretical side. However, we believe; that busy leaders trying to be effective in the daily whitewater of leadership, like yourself, do not have time to discuss the latest leadership theory. Therefore, in our leadership development courses, we have done the research for you. We have formulated the concepts consistent with what other leaders in the field have found and for which there is near universal agreement. This means that participants in our leadership development courses do not have to spend valuable time listening to the research and theories behind the concepts. Rather, they can focus on practice and behaviors which will strengthen their day to day leadership. Continue reading

Letter To An Assistant Principal

Leadership

Dear friend,

Thanks for the email letting me know that you’d been appointed as an assistant principal. Congratulations! I am not surprised that you’ve been given responsibility for discipline, and I was delighted that you asked me for some ideas as you start this new position.

As you know, I have been observing assistant principals and other school leaders for quite some time. It seems that assistants are usually given jobs like discipline and/or supervision of classified staff. In comparison with the bigger picture of educational leadership, being responsible for discipline or classified staff may not seem very important, and it’s tempting to take on the attitude that this lowly assignment is something that everyone has to endure on their way to being a principal–like an initiation or right of passage. This attitude blinds one to the leadership opportunities in these seemingly lowly assignments. I’d encourage you to avoid this “rite of passage” attitude and become a leader in the area of discipline. Don’t just endure—LEAD! Continue reading