TEN THINGS GREAT ORGANIZATIONS DO

What makes a company GREAT

            1. Select people who have the capacity to move the organization to greatness
            2. Clearly articulate the purpose of the organization
            3. Create a shared vision that is compelling for all stakeholders
            4. Embed purpose, vision and goals holographicly into the total system and its parts
            5. Relentlessly pursue goals while remaining flexible to changes in the environment
            6. Emphasize continuous learning for all
            7. Demonstrate empathy for all stakeholders
            8. Build a culture that is both tight (directed) and loose (autonomy)
            9. Disperse leadership into all levels of the organization
            10. Commit to helping improve the world

 

Copyright by TargetSuccess, Inc 2013

6 Qualities In A Leadership Role Model

Steve-Jobs

 

by Sharlyn Lauby

Fascinating article about Leaders and Role Models –

http://www.hrbartender.com/2013/leadership-and-management/6-qualities-in-a-leadership-role-model/

Love the ending…….

Steve Jobs was a leader. Everyone has leadership ability. It’s how we use our leadership abilities that decides if we are a role model for others.

 

 

 

 

Great Employees Are Not Replaceable!

What makes a company GREAT

 

Here is a compelling article about how great employees are not replaceable!

One of the most important lessons I learned during my years as a CEO was that great employees are not replaceable. It isn’t the technology or the product that make a company great, it’s the people. And companies who see their good employees as “replaceable” are wrong. Good employees are not replaceable.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/amyanderson/2013/02/13/great-employees-are-not-replaceable/?goback=.gde_1827_member_218687063

 

The Slippery Slope of Selection – What Leaders Don’t Know about Hiring that Hurts Their Organization

By Peter Pillsbury Sr.

Good to GreatWe would all likely agree with Jim Collins in his popular book, Good To Great, that selecting and hiring the right people is key to organizational success. The most important decisions organizational leaders make is who to hire—organizations don’t achieve greatness without great people; it is that simple! Yet, often, we find selection of talent a slippery slope. The story is all too familiar and goes something like this: Bob was hired six months ago after a rigorous application process including two interviews. In the interviews he appeared friendly and convincing about how his talents would add value to the organization. The members of both interview teams had a good feeling about Bob and liked his confidence and ability to express his beliefs that were consistent with those of the organization. The consensus was a feeling that Bob would be a significant asset to the organization. Everyone involved in the selection process was excited and confident to recommend Bob above all other applicants. Continue reading

What is HR Business Partner Role?

The HR Business Partner is usually the front-office job in Human Resources. It is quite modern. It was introduced by David Ulrich in his book “HR Champion”. The HR Business Partner was a defined as the real partner to the internal clients, the partner understanding the needs of clients and bringing the right solutions to aiming to resolve the issues.

The HR Business Partnership concept created a mess in HR Departments as the implementation of the modern theory was quick and processes were not adjusted to include the new job in the process flowcharts. The implementation of the HR Business Partners is not easy, and the HR Departments should not rush. Continue reading

How to Hire Office Staff – Medical, Dental Profession

doctors dentists chiropractor

 

It is true, a lot of doctors, dentists, chiropractors, physical therapists, acupuncturists, etc. are in THEIR business because of their passion in healing, helping, serving. Conversely they are not in the business of hiring, recruiting, selecting, and developing staff. They know the vision they have for the culture and ‘energy’ of  their office, they know how they want to care for their clients – when they get to hire, sometimes the process gets in the way!  Let’s talk about how to enhance the process.

This is a insightful article about best practices for office staff.

http://tinyurl.com/arvoflj

 

Top 4 Challenges Facing HR For 2013

HR issues

Every year HR faces different challenges that they are required to overcome for the benefit of the business. 2013 will be no exception, and with the continued uncertainty about the economic climate, these challenges may well be more substantial than those faced in 2012.  We’ll invest a little bit of time with each issue that HR is likely to experience:

Talent Attraction

Attracting the right talent for a position is not only essential to meet skill requirements and fill a vacancy within your company; it is also fundamental to the growth and stability of your workforce and business. Have you ever hired the ‘wrong person’? You know, the one who causes morale issues in the office, resentment from colleagues, decreasing productivity?  We have all experienced those hires and can clearly understand the value of hiring the RIGHT person. Continue reading

Disciplined action: The “Stop Doing” list

excerpt from Jim Collins Good to GreatGood To Great

 

Take a look at your desk. If you’re like most hard-charging leaders, you’ve got a well-articulated to-do list. Now take another look: Where’s your stop-doing list? We’ve all been told that leaders make things happen—and that’s true: Pushing that flywheel takes a lot of concerted effort. But it’s also true that good-to-great leaders distinguish themselves by their unyielding discipline to stop doing anything and everything that doesn’t fit tightly within their Hedgehog Concept.

When Darwin Smith and his management team crystallized the Hedgehog Concept for Kimberly-Clark, they faced a dilemma. On one hand, they understood that the best path to greatness lay in the consumer business, where the company had demonstrated a best-in-the-world capability in its building of the Kleenex brand. On the other hand, the vast majority of Kimberly-Clark’s revenue lay in traditional coated-paper mills, turning out paper for magazines and writing pads—which had been the core business of the company for 100 years. Even the company’s namesake town—Kimberly, Wisconsin—was built around a Kimberly-Clark paper mill. Continue reading